Program

The program is now available to download.
This is subject to change and will be updated as required.

Sessions

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM
University House, Common Room

PECRC: Registration

Duration: 30 mins
9:00 AM - 9:15 AM
University House, Common Room

PECRC: Opening

Duration: 15 mins
9:15 AM - 10:30 AM
University House, Common Room

PECRC: Five minute research presentations

Duration: 1.25 hours
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
University House, Common Room

PECRC: Getting started: Commencing postgraduate studies

This panel will focus on issues and challenges surrounding the early stages of master’s/honours and (particularly) PhD programs, including;

  • Supervisor selection and working relationship
  • Determining a thesis topic and formulating research questions/methods
  • Thesis planning and preparation for confirmation
Ms Georgina Fuller

Australian Institute of Criminology

Dr Sally Kelty

University of Canberra

Duration: 1.5 hours
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
University House, Fellows room

PECRC: Reflections on postgraduate completion

This panel will focus on issues and challenges surrounding the middle, and especially final, stages of postgraduate study, including:

  • writing and examination process
  • PhDs by thesis vs by publication
  • managing additional workload (teaching, RA work, publication etc.) and challenges of parttime completion
  • working with your supervisors to complete postgraduate study.
Dr Kelly Hine

Australian National University

Dr Gabriel Wong

Australian National University

Duration: 1.5 hours
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

PECRC: Lunch and poster session

Duration: 1 hour
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
University House, Common Room

PECRC: Current and emerging trends in criminological research methodology

In addition to providing delegates with the opportunity to examine issues regarding widely used quantitative and qualitative methods for undertaking criminological research, this panel will facilitate discussion of new and innovative quantitative and qualitative methodologies being implemented by academic and non-academic researchers in studying crime. Discussion regarding these methods will centre on providing a basic outline of what they are/what they involve, outlining their advantages and how they help us understand crime and the criminal justice system in new and important ways, and examining the challenges in implementing them, particularly for postgraduate and early career researchers.

A/Prof Matthew Manning

Australian National University

Dr Timothy Graham

Australian National University

Ms Melissa Jardine

University of New South Wales

Duration: 1.5 hours
3:00 PM - 3:20 PM

PECRC: Afternoon tea

Duration: 20 mins
3:20 PM - 4:50 PM
University House, Common Room

PECRC: The next step: Careers in (and out) of criminology

This panel will focus on issues, challenges and opportunities regarding career initiation and progression for criminology postgraduates, specifically;

  • The future of criminology as a field and implications for employment opportunities, required skills and knowledge
  • Academic and nonacademic criminology – differences and benefits of working within each
  • What can/should students be doing now to maximise employability?
Dr Russell G Smith

Australian Institute of Criminology

Professor Roderic Broadhurst

Australian National University

Dr Katie Willis

Attorney-General's Department

Duration: 1.5 hours
4:50 PM - 5:00 PM
University House, Common Room

PECRC: Monash University Prize and conference close

Duration: 10 mins
5:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Lucky's Speakeasy

Welcome reception

Duration: 2 hours
7:45 PM - 10:00 PM
Parlour Wine Room

PECRC: Dinner

The PECRC conference dinner will be held at Parlour Wine Room, a short walking distance from QT, at 7:45pm. This is a great opportunity to unwind and network with postgraduate/early career colleagues in a less formal setting. If you wish to attend please specify when registering for the PECRC conference. Please also email any dietary requirements through to the conference organisers. Limited spaces are available so get in quick!

Duration: 2.25 hours
Cost: $50.00
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Level one foyer

Registration

Includes arrival tea and coffee.

Duration: 1 hour
8:55 AM - 10:05 AM
Ballroom one

Official conference opening

Includes Welcome to Country and presentation of the New Zealand Student Award for Best Abstract, Australian Student Award for Best Abstract and the Allan van Zyl Memorial Prize

Duration: 1.17 hours
10:05 AM - 11:05 AM
Ballroom one

Keynote: Crime trends and economic conditions: Research accomplishments and challenges

The study of trends in aggregate crime rates and economic conditions has achieved some notable, if largely unheralded, accomplishments in recent decades. Research challenges remain however, especially regarding abrupt changes in crime rates brought about by exogenous shocks. The accomplishments of studying crime trends are illustrated with examples from research on the relationship between crime trends and economic conditions in the United States. The challenges include the recent unexpected and still unexplained rise in US homicide rates.

Professor Richard Rosenfeld

Richard Rosenfeld's research interests include the social sources of violent crime, crime... More

Duration: 1 hour
11:05 AM - 11:30 AM
Level one foyer

Morning tea

Sponsored by Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences

Duration: 25 mins
11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
Studio two/three

Education and training

Chair: Antje Deckert

  • Leading change through language: An examination of how language and communication can contribute to a safe, inclusive and people-centred policing service
    Leanne Sargent, Victoria Police
  • Changing the crime conversation
    Katherine McLachlan, University of South Australia
  • Using authentic assessment as sites of learning: Enhanced employability and skills building for criminology students
    James Roffee and Kate Burns, Monash University
  • Citation analysis of Australian and New Zealand criminology
    Tara Renae McGee, Griffith University
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
Ballroom three

Indigenous corrections

Chair: Hilde Tubex

  • Spatial distance, socio-economic status and prisoner visitation: Are Australia’s Indigenous people visited less in prison?
    Nicole Ryan, Griffith Criminology Institute
  • The prevalence of prison offending with Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal male prisoner samples in Western Australia
    Catharine Phillips, Edith Cowan University
  • Understanding the experience of prison for First Peoples women: Advantages and disadvantages of interfacing yarning and appreciative inquiry by non-First Peoples researchers
    Sjharn Leeson, Griffith Criminology Institute
  • Twenty-five years post the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, and the nation’s shame continues
    Una Stone, RMIT University
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
Ballroom two

Policing 1

Chair: Adam Masters

  • ‘I haven’t heard anything’: 2013 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras redux
    Justin Ellis, University of Sydney
  • Toward reintegrative policing: Desistance and the problem of law enforcement
    Mark Halsey and Andrew Goldsmith, Flinders University
  • Policing in a changing Vietnam: An ethnography
    Melissa Jardine, University of New South Wales
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
Eureka room

Rape

Chair: Marilyn McMahon

  • ‘Rape's rape, isn't it?’: Listening to LGBTIQ people’s stories of sexual violence
    Shaez Mortimer, RMIT University
  • Narratives of force and resistance in rape trials in Victoria
    Rachael Burgin, Monash University
  • Lazarus v R: Communication in New South Wales sexual assault law
    Gail Mason, University of Sydney
  • An analysis of a high-profile rape trial: The case of UK footballer Ched Evans
    Kathryn Royal, Durham University
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
Studio one

Corrections 1

Chair: Peter Nordern

  • Can family-prisoner relationships ever improve during incarceration?
    Daniel McCarthy, University of Surrey
  • Making space for imprisoned fathers: Fatherhood, liminality and post-prison reintegration
    Diana Johns, The University of Melbourne
  • The performance of parole: Transformative justice in practice
    Anna Eriksson, Monash University and James R Brennan
  • Reintegration outside of the lens of rehabilitation: A community sector analysis of services funded to reduce re-offending
    Mindy Sotiri, The Community Restorative Centre
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Ballroom one

Cognitive criminology

Chair: Stavroola Anderson

  • Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in the Australian youth justice system: Prevalence and implications
    Hayley Passmore, Telethon Kids Institute
  • Neurolaw in Australia: The use of neuroscientific evidence in criminal proceedings
    Armin Alimardani, University of New South Wales
  • Depression and anxiety in adolescent and young adult offenders: A longitudinal study from 13-32 years using the Australian Temperament Project
    Ben Edwards, Australian National University
Duration: 1 hour
12:50 PM - 1:50 PM
Level one foyer

Lunch

Duration: 1 hour
1:50 PM - 2:50 PM
Ballroom one

Drugs and crime

Chair: Natalie Gately

  • Is wastewater analysis useful for understanding rural drug use?
    Jeremy Prichard, University of Tasmania
  • Drug users and drug policy: Letting lived experience inform policy
    James Rowe, RMIT University
  • Media, policy and the law: The creation of the 'new ice risk'
    Pota Forrest-Lawrence, Western Sydney University
  • Attitudes, policy support and drug-related harms in Australia: findings from the National Drug Strategy Household Survey
    Josh Sweeney, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
Duration: 1 hour
1:50 PM - 3:10 PM
Ballroom three

Indigenous justice

Chair: Nicole Ryan

  • Building effective throughcare strategies for Indigenous offenders
    Hilde Tubex, University of Western Australia
  • Child sexual abuse among indigenous populations: Distinctions in abuse patterns and institutional response
    Paul Steele, University of New Mexico
  • Social media, vigilantism and Indigenous people
    Chris Cunneen and Sophie Russell, University of New South Wales
  • Imagining the just prison: Results from an exploration of prison quality for First Peoples women in Australia
    Sjharn Leeson, Griffith University
Duration: 1.33 hours
1:50 PM - 3:10 PM
Ballroom two

Radicalisation, terror and political violence

Chair: John Paget

  • Revealing the hidden pathways to radicalisation using social network analysis
    David Bright, Flinders University
  • Representations of terrorism and Muslim identities within national and local news media
    Amy Pisani, University of New South Wales
  • Sentencing laws in Indonesian terrorism prosecutions
    Milda Istiqomah, University of New South Wales
Duration: 1.33 hours
1:50 PM - 2:50 PM
Studio one

Sex and tech

Chair: Lynne Roberts

  • Young adults' perceptions of, and engagement with, online sexually explicit material in Australia and the UK
    Nadine McKillop, University of the Sunshine Coast
  • Folksonomies of misogyny: ‘Creepshots’, social tagging and networked misogyny
    Chrissy Thompson, University of Melbourne
  • Responding to image-based sexual assault: Results from a national study
    Asher Flynn, Monash University
Duration: 1 hour
1:50 PM - 2:50 PM
Studio two/three

Public spaces

Chair: Duncan Chappell

  • Policing with drug detection dogs in public settings: Mapping embodied harms
    Peta Malins, RMIT University
Duration: 1 hour
1:50 PM - 3:10 PM
Eureka room

Crime online

Chair: Alyce McGovern

  • The malware architect: A criminological perspective
    Sarah Morrison, Macquarie University
  • Internet users knowledge and attitudes towards the online viewing of child exploitation material in Australia
    Charlotte Hunn, University of Tasmania
  • Using financial intelligence to target online fraud victimisation
    Cassandra Cross, Queensland University of Technology
  • Re-conceptualising 'place' in cyberspace
    Tony Krone, University of Canberra
Duration: 1.33 hours
3:10 PM - 3:40 PM

Afternoon tea

Duration: 30 mins
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
Ballroom one

Panel: Out with the old, in with the new? Contemporary scholars review articles from the early days of ANZSOC

50th Anniversary special panel (Part 2)

Chair: Russell Smith

Please read the following journal articles prior to attending this panel:

Duration: 1 hour
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
Ballroom two

Panel: Surveillance technologies: Perspectives and perceptions of police detainees

Chair: Murray Lee

  • Being held to account: Police detainees and body worn cameras
  • Police detainee perspectives on CCTV
  • Quantitative analysis of the perceptions of police body worn cameras

Presenters:

  • Murray Lee, David Kohn and Roman Marchant, University of Sydney
  • Emmeline Taylor, City University of London
  • Matthew Willis, Australian Institute of Criminology
Duration: 1 hour
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
Ballroom three

Panel: Crime and justice in digital society

Chair: Anastasia Powell

  • I’ll take that as hate speech: Gendered contentions, Pauline Hanson and #qanda
    Robin Cameron, RMIT University
  • Following #JillMeagher: Participatory ‘justice’ and collective meaning-making in digital society
    Anastasia Powell, RMIT University
  • What happens next? Do digital activists achieve their goals in the digital society
    Gregory Stratton, RMIT University
Duration: 1 hour
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
Studio one

Panel: Exploring views on offence seriousness, sentencing factors and sentence severity:

The jury study findings

Chair: Kate Warner

  • Factors mitigating sentence: How do the views of judges and jurors compare?
    Kate Warner, University of Tasmania
  • Public perceptions of the relative seriousness of sex offences
    Lynne Roberts, Curtin University
  • Why the gap: Explaining inconsitency in public opinions on sentencing in situation-specific and general contexts
    Caroline Spiranovic, University of Tasmania
Duration: 1 hour
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
Studio two/three

Panel: Understanding and preventing harmful sexual behaviour by youth

Chair: Nadine McKillop

  • Understanding and preventing the onset of child sexual abuse in adolescence and adulthood
    Nadine McKillop, University of the Sunshine Coast
  • A comparison of Australian Indigenous and non-Indigenous males who commit sexual offences
    Damity Adams, Griffith Criminology Institute
  • Can systemic interventions designed to reduce reoffending by youth also reduce their victimisation?
    Nadine McKillop, University of the Sunshine Coast
Duration: 1 hour
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
Eureka room

Panel: Gender violence in Australia: Historical perspectives

Chair: Alana Piper

  • The ‘protection of women in lonely situations’: Rape offences and sentencing practices in colonial New South Wales in the 1850s
    Wendy Kukulies-Smith, Australian National University
  • The role of economic abuse in domestic violence across the nineteenth and twentieth century
    Alana Piper, Griffith University
  • ‘I wanted to protect Mum’: Prosecuting children who killed violent men, 1900-1956
    Lisa Durnian, Griffith University
Duration: 1 hour
4:40 PM - 5:40 PM
Ballroom two

Roundtable: Transnational crime in Australia and New Zealand across the decades:

Its changing nature, threat and mitigation

Chair: Rob McCusker, De Montfort University

Duration: 1 hour
4:40 PM - 5:40 PM
Ballroom three

Roundtable: Sexual violence in a digital age

Chair: Anastasia Powell

  • Anastasia Powell, Georgina Heydon, Marg Liddell and Tully O'Neill, RMIT University
Duration: 1 hour
4:40 PM - 5:40 PM
Studio one

Panel: Parole and public opinion

Chair: Lorana Bartels

  • Parole, populism and penal policy
    Arie Freiberg, Monash University
  • Damnation or redemption? Public attitudes toward parole in the era of ‘forfeiture’ of punishment
    Robin Fitzgerald, University of Queensland
  • The punitive woman? Gender differences in public attitudes toward parole
    Shannon Buglar, Robin Fitzgerald
Duration: 1 hour
4:40 PM - 5:40 PM
Studio two/three

Panel: The intersection of out-of-home care and criminal justice:

Historical perspectives, consequences and future directions

Chair: Emma Colvin

  • A problem yet to be acknowledged: The ‘systems abuse’ of children in out-of-home-care and the criminal justice system in Australia
    Kath McFarlane, Charles Sturt University
  • From child in need to adult offender: The intersection of outof-home care and criminal justice in New Zealand
    Elizabeth Stanley, Victoria University of Wellington
  • What we are doing about out-of-home care: Addressing the intersection of out-of-home care and the criminal justice systems in the United Kingdom
    Claire Fitzpatrick, University of Lancaster
Duration: 1 hour
4:40 PM - 5:40 PM
Ballroom one

Roundtable: The research, policy and practice nexus: Future directions for criminology

Chair: Anika Dell

  • Anika Dell, Department of Justice and Regulation, Victoria
  • Garner Clancey, University of Sydney
  • Andrew Goldsmith, Flinders University
  • Tessa Boyd-Caine, Health Justice Australia
Duration: 1 hour
6:30 PM - 10:30 PM
Old Parliament House, Members' Dining Room 2

Conference dinner

The conference dinner will be at The Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House on Wednesday 6 December.

Duration: 4 hours
Cost: $120.00
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Registration

Includes arrival tea and coffee

Duration: 1 hour
9:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Day two opening and awards

Duration: 30 mins
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Ballroom one

Keynote: A view from the coalface: Indigenous Australians and the criminal justice system

The Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in custody some 25 years ago identified a range of key factors relevant to the incarceration and wellbeing of Indigenous Australians caught in the criminal justice system. It was considered at the time to be a pivotal moment in the historically fraught relationship between Indigenous Australians and the State via the criminal justice system.  The RCIADIC set out numerous recommendations intended to improve that relationship and enhance the safety of Indigenous peoples in that system.  Despite the blueprint for improvement provided by the RCIADIC the position of Indigenous Australians within the criminal justice system has worsened and the position of Indigenous women is particularly bleak. Drawing on years of experience in the criminal justice system this presentation will explore the position of Indigenous people within the criminal justice system with a particular commentary on Indigenous women via their intersection roles of offender, victim and care and protection client.

Ms Louise Taylor

Louise Taylor is a Kamilaroi woman, a lawyer and the Deputy Chief Executive Officer of Legal Aid... More

Duration: 1 hour
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM

Morning tea

Duration: 30 mins
11:00 AM - 12:20 PM
Ballroom one

Legislation and orders

Chair: Anita Mackay

  • Breaches of court-ordered conditions in Victoria: Prevalence and sentencing outcomes
    Paul McGorrery, Sentencing Advisory Council (Victoria)
  • Providing a check on prosecutorial decision-making: An analysis of the Victims' Right to Review reform
    Mary Iliadis, Monash University
  • The innocence problem: Mitigation, rehabilitation and ‘no body, no parole’ laws
    Michele Ruyters, RMIT University
  • Pocketing the proceeds of crime: Recent legislation in a criminological perspective
    Hilde Tubex and Sarah Murray, University of Western Australia
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:00 AM - 12:20 PM
Ballroom three

Culture and religion

Chair: Daniel McCarthy

  • Alternative and innovative responses to addressing social cohesion: A co-design approach between Victoria Police and the community
    Aimee Griffin, Victoria Police
  • Interpreter usage and access to procedural justice for linguistically diverse clients of the criminal justice system
    Joseph MacFarlane, RMIT University
  • Love thy Niebuhr: Employing theological precepts in the criminological quest
    Rick Sarre, University of South Australia
  • Resolving a religious dispute through mediation in India
    Rajesh Sharma, RMIT University
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Ballroom two

Policing 2

Chair: Justin Ellis

  • ‘Shock absorbers’: The role of the New South Wales Police Force’s multicultural community liaison officers in policing ‘Middle Eastern crime’
    Megan McElhone, University of New South Wales
  • ASEAN law enforcement cooperation in an era of complex global crime
    Paul Battersby, RMIT University
  • Age, inexperience or something else altogether? Examining illicit substance use amongst police officers
    Timothy Cubitt, New South Wales Police Force
Duration: 1 hour
11:00 AM - 12:20 PM
Studio one

Corrections policy and practice

Chair: Marietta Martinovic

  • Risk classification tools: A snapshot of insights from a literature scoping exercise
    Harriet Westcott, The University of Sydney
  • Uncaging the beast: Examining risk as the driver of a separate and distinct strand of penal policy development
    Jordan Anderson, Victoria University of Wellington
  • What's the point of independent monitoring of closed places?
    Neil Morgan, Office of the Inspector of Custodial Services
  • More New South Wales prisons: Evidence-free public policy
    John Paget, Charles Sturt University
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:00 AM - 12:20 PM
Studio two/three

International perspectives

Chair: Roderic Broadhurst

  • The immoral, the illegal and the criminal: Exploring the relationship between law and corporate harm in Indonesia
    Fiona Haines, University of Melbourne
  • At gunpoint: Firearm use, homicide and organised crime in Mexico
    Rolando Ochoa, Macquarie University
  • An examination of safety and security measures at state hospitals in South Africa
    Mokata Johannes Nkwana, University of South Africa
  • Hotels in Gauteng Province, South Africa: Is safety and security of assets a priority?
    Nomsa Cebekhulu, University of South Africa
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Eureka room

Women and offending 1

Chair: Hayley Boxall

  • The offending, conviction and sentencing of female sex offenders who abuse children when working in institutional contexts
    Andrea Darling, Durham University
  • Women and welfare fraud in Australia
    Scarlet Wilcock, University of Wollongong
  • Women and gender in Australian drug policy: A critical policy analysis
    Natalie Thomas, University of New England
Duration: 1 hour
12:20 PM - 1:50 PM

Lunch

Duration: 1.5 hours
12:30 PM - 1:50 PM

ANZSOC Annual General Meeting

Duration: 1.33 hours
1:50 PM - 3:10 PM
Ballroom one

Perspectives on justice

Chair: Christopher Dowling

  • Conceptualising the social determinants of justice
    Ruth McCausland, University of New South Wales
  • Punishment as acratic action: A view from sociological systems theory
    Jesse Cunningham, University of Sydney
  • Risk to resilience: Technology-enabled risk management and deterrence
    Janine Mahoney, IPP Consulting
  • A life lived in fear is a life half lived: Balancing community fear with offender hypervigilance
    Danielle Harris, Griffith University
Duration: 1.33 hours
1:50 PM - 3:10 PM
Ballroom three

Young people 1

Chair: Kath McFarlane

  • Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision, 2015-16
    Kirsten Morgan and Callin Ivanovici, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
  • The importance of out-of-home-care: The views of magistrates in the New South Wales Children’s Court regarding children in care in the New South Wales criminal justice system
    Emma Colvin, Charles Sturt University
  • Breaking the care-crime connection for girls in out-of-home care
    Claire Fitzpatrick, Lancaster University
  • Change the story: Collaborative early intervention for youth justice
    Karina Chicote, Save the Children
Duration: 1.33 hours
1:50 PM - 2:50 PM
Ballroom two

Policing 3

Chair: Melissa Jardine

  • Understanding police use of force encounters in context: What encounters look like, circumstances when officers get injured, and the decision factors and processes involved
    Kelly Hine, Australian National University
  • Show cause analysis: Understanding the drivers of police misconduct as reported by New South Wales police officers
    Timothy Cubitt, New South Wales Police Force
  • Police corruption and the rise of the guilty plea in Queensland's Supreme Court
    Lisa Durnian, Griffith University
Duration: 1 hour
1:50 PM - 3:10 PM
Eureka room

Crime and society 1

Chair: Rob White

  • A tale of two mafias
    Adam Masters and Hannah Fox, Australian National University
  • ‘Long on hocus-pocus and short on transparency’: A criminological guide to the contemporary Australian art market
    Duncan Chappell, University of Sydney
  • Preventing art fraud through emerging technology: Application of a regulatory pluralism model
    Jade Lindley, University of Western Australia
  • Neighbourhood Watch 2.0: Community crime prevention meets social media
    Mark Wood and Chrissy Thompson, University of Melbourne
Duration: 1.33 hours
1:50 PM - 3:10 PM
Studio one

Corrections: Experiences of prison

Chair: Rick Sarre

  • Solitary confinement in Australian prisons: From reformation to oppression
    Peter Norden, RMIT University
  • Friendly but not friends: Prison staff and professional boundaries
    Anna Eriksson, Monash University
  • Unpacking the ‘black box’ of prison life: Understanding its importance for Indigenous Australians’ re-entry outcomes
    Nicole Ryan, Griffith Criminology Institute
  • ‘Prison doesn’t worry me’: The need to account for cultural difference in the evaluation of prison performance
    Sjharn Leeson, Griffith University
Duration: 1.33 hours
1:50 PM - 3:10 PM
Studio two/three

Victims and survivors

Chair: Larissa Sandy

  • Victimisation experiences and their association with informal social control actions
    Rebecca Wickes, Monash University
  • Challenging assumptions: Victim needs when returning to work after armed robbery
    Georgina Fuller, Australian Institute of Criminology
  • Traumatic brain injury following assault: The psychosocial impact on caregivers
    David Belsham, Griffith University
  • Military jurisdiction in Australia: Accountability and access to remedies for victims
    Sharyn Jenkins, University of New South Wales
Duration: 1.33 hours
3:10 PM - 3:40 PM

Afternoon tea

Duration: 30 mins
3:40 PM - 5:00 PM
Ballroom one

Immigration detention and imprisonment

Chair: Anna Eriksson

  • From transportation to deportation: The mass deportation of non-Australian citizens with criminal convictions.             
  • Peter Norden, RMIT University
  • Immigration detention: Exploring its depth, weight, length and breadth
    Lorena Rivas, Griffith University
  • Changing views and perceptions: The impact of the Inside Out Prison Exchange Program on inside and outside students
    Marietta Martinovic, RMIT University
Duration: 1.33 hours
3:40 PM - 5:00 PM
Ballroom three

Young people 2

Chair:

  • Language, social inference and antisocial behaviour in young offenders: Analysis of interrelationships
    Stavroola Anderson, University of Sydney
  • Exploring new ideas about how to respond to child exploitation material users: Early intervention and automated messages
    Jeremy Prichard and Caroline Spiranovic, University of Tasmania and Tony Krone, University of Canberra
  • Making opportunity knock: Young burglary offenders' descriptions of their motivations and decision-making
    James McCue, Edith Cowan University
  • Dysfunction, disconnection and drugs: The narratives of young people who come into conflict with the law
    Natalie Gately, Edith Cowan University
Duration: 1.33 hours
3:40 PM - 5:00 PM
Ballroom two

Change and desistance

Chair: Ross Homel

  • Yoga as a wellbeing intervention in an Australian prison: A pilot program
    Anthony Hopkins, Australian National University and Lorana Bartels, University of Canberra
  • ‘Nevertheless, he desisted’: The strategies that men use to stop sexually offending
    Danielle Harris, Griffith University
  • Restorative justice: Innovative approaches, diverse applications
    Daniel Clements, Jesuit Social Services and Alikki Vernon, Victorian Association of Restorative Practice
  • Transforming lives and reducing recidivism
    Gerry Georgatos, Ngalla Maya
Duration: 1.33 hours
3:40 PM - 5:00 PM
Eureka room

Gendered violence

Chair: Lisa Harris

  • ‘What about men?’: Discourses of resistance to gendered perspectives on violence against women
    Naomi Pfitzner, RMIT University
  • ‘Ordinary domestic murder’? Sentencing men convicted of murdering their female intimate partners
    Marilyn McMahon, Deakin University
  • Not just 'add women and stir': Primary prevention of gender based violence in sport settings
    Ruth Liston, RMIT University
  • ‘The grey area’: Negotiating the meaning of consent in online anti-rape activism
    Rachel Loney-Howes, La Trobe University
Duration: 1.33 hours
3:40 PM - 5:00 PM
Studio one

Family violence and abuse

Chair: Rebecca Wickes

  • What do survivors and advocates want for redress? Views on a national scheme for institutional abuse of children
    Kathleen Daly, Griffith University
  • Domestic violence and completed suicide in New South Wales: Preliminary findings
    Emma Buxton-Namisnyk and Anna Butler, NSW Department of Justice
  • Conceptualising family violence in sentencing: Acknowledging past practice and imagining the future potential of therapeutic jurisprudence
    Nina Hudson, University of Tasmania
  • Gaby's story: How economic abuse is perpetuated by our legal and administrative systems
    Marg Liddell, RMIT University
Duration: 1.33 hours
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
Studio two/three

New technology and techniques

Chair: Asher Flynn

  • Framing surveillance: Photo elicitation of young peoples' experience of everyday surveillance
    Emmeline Taylor, City University of London
  • Explaining the body-worn camera perspective bias
    Remi Boivin, Université de Montréal
  • The Digital Future of Prisons: Communication Technologies and Portals to the Free World
    Carolyn McKay, University of Sydney
Duration: 1 hour
8:00 AM - 8:45 AM

Registration

Includes arrival tea and coffee

Duration: 45 mins
8:45 AM - 9:00 AM

Day three opening and awards

Duration: 15 mins
9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Ballroom one

Keynote: Moving beyond ritualism: Acknowledging state-institutional violence

Institutional violence and harms against children have been subject to increasing attention. Commissions and courts—across Australia, Canada, Northern Ireland, and among other countries—have exposed long-hidden testimonies of sexual, physical and psychological terror inflicted by state workers and their contractors. In Aotearoa-New Zealand, disclosures have been more muted. At the time of writing, the government refuses to mount a public Commission of Inquiry, or to provide a general apology to the thousands victimised in state care. Drawing on research undertaken with 105 ‘victims’, this presentation considers the meaning of acknowledgement in the wake of state-institutional violence. It imagines a future of acknowledgement processes that move beyond ritualism. In doing so, it prioritises the role of rights, risks and responsibilities in accounting for, and preventing, violence.

Dr Elizabeth Stanley

Elizabeth Stanley is a Reader in Criminology and a Rutherford Discovery Fellow at the Institute... More

Duration: 1 hour
10:00 AM - 10:25 AM

Morning tea

Duration: 25 mins
10:25 AM - 11:25 AM
Ballroom one

Child sexual abuse

Chair: Trish McCluskey

  • Can cross-agency teams improve the criminal justice response to allegations of child sexual abuse? The evaluation of the Multiagency Investigation and Support Team (Western Australia)
    James Herbert, University of South Australia
  • ‘No action required’: A historical pattern of inaction towards child sexual abuse by the Queensland Police Service
    Paul Bleakley, University of New England
  • Police officers’ perceptions of a child sex offender register: Identifying and responding to risk
    Kindalin Masters, Griffith University
Duration: 1 hour
10:25 AM - 11:25 AM
Ballroom three

Young people 3

Chair:

  • Compare and contrast: Effective approaches to youth justice in Europe and the United States
    Daniel Clements, Jesuit Social Services
  • Rumble’s Quest as a tool for crime prevention: The development and properties of a measure of child social-emotional wellbeing
    Ross Homel and Jacqueline Homel, Griffith University
  • Did the Pathways to Prevention Project reduce youth offending? Sixteen-year outcomes of a multi-systemic developmental prevention project
    Jacqueline Homel, Griffith University
Duration: 1 hour
10:25 AM - 11:25 AM
Studio one

Women and offending 2

Chair: Ruth McCausland

  • The criminal careers of female homicide offenders
    Li Eriksson, Griffith University
  • Versatile offending and the criminal careers of female offenders in Victoria, 1860–1920
    Alana Piper, Griffith University
  • Rural and urban female offending in Victoria, 1860–1920
    Victoria Nagy (via video), Deakin University
     
Duration: 1 hour
10:25 AM - 11:25 AM
Studio two/three

Family and domestic violence 1

Chair: Paula Piccinini

  • Imagining a future free of family violence: Creating consistency in correctly identifying the primary aggressor
    Annette Gillespie, safe steps Family Violence Response Centre
  • Responding to recidivist offending in family violence: Applying a ‘serious crimes’ and integrated support approach
    Lisa Harris, RMIT University
  • Should non-physical family violence be prosecuted as stalking in Australia and New Zealand?
    Marilyn McMahon and Paul McGorrery, Deakin University
Duration: 1 hour
10:25 AM - 11:05 AM
Ballroom two

Fraud

Chair: Cassandra Cross

  • Age and consumer fraud: Are some age groups more vulnerable to fraud victimisation?
    Penny Jorna, Australian Institute of Criminology
  • Exposing fish fraud as the ultimate illicit network
    Jade Lindley, The University of Western Australia
Duration: 40 mins
11:25 AM - 11:30 AM

Changeover

Duration: 5 mins
11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
Ballroom one

Perspectives on violence

Chair: Anastasia Powell

  • Cascades of violence and macrocriminology
    John Braithwaite, Australian National University
  • Violence and Elias's historical sociology: The case of Cambodia
    Roderic Broadhurst, Australian National University
  • Responding to young peoples' violence: Amplifying or addressing the problem?
    Diana Johns, University of Melbourne and Marg Liddell, RMIT University
  • Can police violence be addressed through democratic reform?
    Darren Palmer, Deakin University
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
Ballroom three

Young People 4

Chair: Emma Colvin

  • The act of monitoring in forensic interviews: Does it impact on child accuracy?
    Tess Patterson, University of Otago
  • Young perpetrators and child victims: The scope of human rights standards
    Nessa Lynch, Victoria University of Wellington
  • Reducing the gap between the conceptualisation and measurement of reintegration of children affected by armed conflict
    Luke Bearup and Ibolya Losoncz, Australian National University
  • Improving the management of young people with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in detention
    Hayley Passmore, Telethon Kids Institute
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
Ballroom two

Policing: Culture and practice

Chair: Timothy Cubitt

  • ‘The Meme Team’: Exploring the use of humour in police social media
    Alyce McGovern, University of New South Wales
  • Sexism, racism, homophobia and intolerance towards 'difference' within British police
    Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University
  • Positive thinking, coping skills, and well-being: An empirical study of future police recruits
    Doris Chu, National Chung Cheng University
  • The impact of Local Area Command based policing on crime rates: Assessing the New South Wales Police Force structure as a mode of crime prevention
    Timothy Cubitt, Western Sydney University
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
Studio one

Carriages of justice

Chair: Christine Bond

  • Royal commissions and wrongful convictions in Australia
    Jacqueline Fuller, Griffith University
  • Why haven't innocence projects in Australia been successful?
    Gregory Stratton and Michele Ruyters, RMIT University
  • The right to prepare a criminal defence while imprisoned
    Anita Mackay, La Trobe University
  • The emergence of neuroscience as a commonly admitted type of evidence in Australian criminal courts: How it happened and why we should care
    Armin Alimardani, Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales
Duration: 1.33 hours
11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
Studio two/three

Sentencing and outcomes

Chair: Lorana Bartels

  • An eco-centric approach to the sentencing of environmental offences
    Rob White, University of Tasmania
  • The relevance of political motivations to sentencing
    Jamie Walvisch, Monash University
  • Sentencing young offenders in Western Australia: What mitigates punitive views of offending held by the general public?
    Suzanne Ellis, Edith Cowan University
  • Reducing Indigenous imprisonment: The role of intimidation                              
    Don Weatherburn, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research
Duration: 1.33 hours
12:50 PM - 1:50 PM

Lunch

Duration: 1 hour
1:50 PM - 3:10 PM
Ballroom one

Acknowledging the past, imagining the future

Chair: Russell Smith

 

  • Most influential publications in Australian and New Zealand criminology (1967-2017)
    Tara Renae McGee and Li Eriksson, Griffith University
  • Gun control legislation: Australia's 20-year leading role on the world stage
    Philip Alpers, University of Sydney
  • A history of community strengthening in Australia: Decentralisation, policy, partnerships and practice
    Yolande Robinson, Griffith University
  • Imagining future criminal law in Australia
    Marcus Smith, Charles Sturt University
Duration: 1.33 hours
1:50 PM - 2:30 PM
Ballroom three

Young People 5

Chair:

  • The Victorian Therapeutic Treatment Board, 10 years on: Learnings from a legal-therapeutic response to sexually harmful behaviour by children and young people
    Trish McCluskey, Department of Health and Human Services, Victoria
  • Children in conflict with law versus law in conflict with children: Deciphering the National Crime Records Bureau: Crime data and policy discourse in India
    Muzaffar Mir, Jamia Millia Islamia
Duration: 40 mins
1:50 PM - 2:50 PM
Ballroom two

Beyond the surface: Intelligence and forensics

Chair: Paul Bleakley

  • Where has all the strategic criminal intelligence gone?
    Phil Kowalick, Queensland University of Technology
  • Networked offending: Street crime meets the Internet's space of flows 
    Mark Wood and William Arpke-Wales, University of Melbourne
  • Acknowledging the past through the recuperation of human remains
    Natalia Maystorovich Chulio, University of Sydney
Duration: 1 hour
1:50 PM - 2:50 PM
Studio one

Crime and society 2

Chair: Jade Lindley

  • The role of co-offending networks in criminal careers  
    Alana Piper, Griffith University
  • Trafficking in quantifacts: Unpacking the grand narrative of trafficking-as-organised-crime in criminological research
    Larissa Sandy, RMIT University
  • Statistical analysis of the relationship between crime, electronic gaming machine accessibility and demographics: New South Wales, Australia
    Roman Marchant, University of Sydney
Duration: 1 hour
1:50 PM - 3:10 PM
Studio two/three

Family and domestic violence 2

Chair:

  • Innovative court responses to family violence: A 12-month evaluation of the Southport Domestic and Family Violence Specialist Court trial
    Christine Bond, Griffith University
  • Time matters: The importance of targeted, timely and graduated responses to domestic violence
    Hayley Boxall, Australian Institute of Criminology
  • What do we know about the outcomes of police responses to domestic violence? A systematic review
    Christopher Dowling, Australian Institute of Criminology
  • Universal Services Team at Eastern Domestic Violence Service
    Paula Piccinini, Eastern Domestic Violence Service
Duration: 1.33 hours
2:50 PM - 3:40 PM
The Deck outside the Eureka room

Ice cream social

The Ice cream social is sponsored by the American Society of Criminology

Duration: 50 mins